Blog archive: Tunisia

  • 16th October 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Next Sunday, October 23, will deliver the first tangible fruits of the uprising that toppled President Ben Ali in Tunisia when voters elect a 218-member National Constituent Assembly. The assembly will not be a parliament as such: its main task is to draft a new constitution and prepare for...
  • 14th April 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Following the revolution in Tunisia, I have begun updating theTunisia section here on al-bab. Links to several historically interesting documents had stopped working because of the deletion of websites belonging to the old regime. I have retrieved some of them through the Wayback archive...
  • 25th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    In an article for The Atlantic, Alexis Madrigal, formerly of Wired magazine, takes a detailed look at the recent battle between the Tunisian authorities and Facebook – and how Facebook responded to it. He writes: After more than ten days of intensive investigation and study, Facebook...
  • 18th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Having got rid of Ben Ali and his family, the question now for Tunisians is how to dismantle the system of control that he established over the last 23 years – and it's looking far from easy. Without continuous pressure from the public, the Ben Ali loyalists are likely to retrench and continue...
  • 18th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Almanara, the Libyan opposition website whose disappearance I reported yesterday, is now back on line and saying that it was attacked by Gaddafi's security people. Al-Jazeera has a storyabout it (in Arabic). Besides declaring his support for the ousted Tunisian president...
  • 16th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Just in case you are wondering about the pet tiger belonging to Ben Ali's 30-year-old son-in-law, Mohamed Sakhr el Materi – it has been killed. There's an unpleasant video here if you want to see. Materi himself fled Tunisia last week, reportedly to Paris. Rumours of the...
  • 15th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    IMPORTANT: See update  After fleeing Tunisia yesterday, Zine el Abidine Ben Ali made a circuitous journey around the Mediterranean. His plane first headed south to Libya, then north towards Paris where he was apparently told he would not be welcome. After a reported...
  • 15th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    An update to my post earlier today. Tunisia's constitutional council  has now decided that the chairman of parliament, Fouad Mebazaa, should be acting president – and not prime minister Mohamed Ghannouchi. The council says that Article 57 of the constitution, rather than...
  • 14th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    A Tunisian officer salutes the funeral of one of the protests' victims. Bizerte, Thursday. Source: nawaat.    In his speech to Tunisians last night, President Ben Ali went for double or quits. Either he has done enough to quell the protests with his offers to stand down in...
  • 14th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    In due course, every city of consequence in Tunisia will have a street or square named after Mohamed Bouazizi, the unemployed fruit-seller whose humiliation at the hands of the authorities led to a revolution. It's sad that he didn't live to see it but today's events are a fitting tribute. It is...
  • 13th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Today is exactly four weeks since the start of the Tunisian uprising and I was planning to write another summary of the day's main events. But, honestly, I can't. There's so much going on, so much chaos. Let me just point to two things which, basically, say it all. One was the demonstration...
  • 12th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The regime is clinging on and making some minor concessions which are probably far too late. The security crackdown is obviously placing huge demands on the police and military. In a trial of strength, can the protesters stretch them to breaking point? Maybe the endgame is approaching but the big...

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