Blog archive: Yemen

  • 30th October 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
      A controversial NGO headed by a man who once ran a fake university in Norway is playing a central role in efforts to solve Yemen's political crisis. The Global Network for Rights and Development (GNRD), together with Yemen's National Center for Human Rights and Democratic Development (...
  • 17th October 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    One of the less-discussed effects of political turmoil in Yemen over the last few years has been the proliferation of media. Despite widespread illiteracy, Yemen now has around 90 newspapers published weekly or more often and the state's monopoly on broadcasting has been broken; there are several...
  • 26th September 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
       The Houthis celebrate in Sanaa with fireworks    LAST WEEKEND Houthi fighters took over key parts of the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, and celebrated with a massive fireworks display. Government security forces are now said to be cooperating with them in guarding the city...
  • 12th August 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Yemen's rumour mill has gone into overdrive after the reported discovery of a tunnel, some 80-90 metres long, running between what appears to be a large warehouse and the home of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh. Supporters of the ex-dictator are claiming this was part of an assassination plot...
  • 31st July 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    No comment     Posted by Brian Whitaker Thursday, 31 July 2014  
  • 1st July 2014
    By
    Mareike Transfeld
    The British withdrawal from Aden in 1967 left Yemen divided into two states – north and south – both of them aspiring to national unity. After a lengthy period of on/off negotiation and occasional conflicts they eventually unified in 1990. Unification soon turned sour, however, and in...
  • 18th June 2014
    By
      Earlier this year, Yemen embarked on plans to create a federal state comprising six regions. For some, a "United States of Yemen" offers the best hope of preserving national unity in the face of separatist activism. Others fear it will exacerbate separatist tendencies, possibly leading to...
  • 16th June 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Scene of confrontation: the Saleh mosque in Sana'a Close to the presidential palace in Sana'a is the Saleh mosque. Build at a cost of $60m and opened in 2008 by President Ali Abdullah Saleh (after whom the mosque is named), it is one of the most extravagant buildings in Yemen, with five...
  • 5th April 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Yemen is one of the least known Arab countries and one of the most misunderstood. For outsiders, it can be a baffling place – a wayward republic among the Arabian monarchies, a society that is still largely tribal (and heavily armed to boot), a place where millions while away their afternoons...
  • 13th February 2014
    By
    Brian Whitaker
      Click here to enlarge map    The year 1990 marked what many Yemenis hoped would be the start of a new era when the northern and southern states – relics of British and Turkish imperialism – merged into one. The British had taken Aden as a colony in 1839 and then extended...
  • 20th November 2013
    By
    Brian Whitaker
      Presidential extension?  Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi Presidential contender?  Ahmad Saleh Following the uprising that led to the fall of President Saleh in Yemen, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi was...
  • 13th November 2013
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    An article in the Washington Post by David Ignatius reveals previously unreported French involvement in Yemen's Houthi conflict last year. It says that the Saudis asked the US for imagery from surveillance satellites to assist their bombing of rebel positions in Yemen, but...

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