Blog archive: Tunisia

  • 11th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The Tunisian regime was fighting for survival yesterday. Reports and videos of clashes between police and demonstrators circulated on the internet throughout the day – so many that it became difficult to keep track. In some of them civilians were shot and killed – though at this stage...
  • 11th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    A brief summary of reported events in Tunisia on Tuesday: Latest videos: Police attack demonstrators outside union building in Sfax; early morning incident in the centre of Bizerte; protest in Ben Guerdane. Tunisian stock market falls again, to...
  • 10th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    [This is a Google-assisted translation of the French version posted on the Tunisie7 website.] Citizens, citizens, I am addressing you today, inside and outside the country, following disturbances and acts of violence and degradation that have targeted public and private property in some...
  • 10th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The Tunisian uprising is beginning to get more coverage in the English-language media, so this may be a suitable moment to look at the sort of coverage it is getting.  Considering the horrific violence meted out by the police over the weekend, the Ben Ali regime is being given an...
  • 9th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The Tunisian regime has responded to American calls for restraint... with live bullets. A number of protesters were shot dead last night – possibly 10 or more. Most reports attribute the shootings to the police, though the army has now been deployed some areas – allegedly to protect...
  • 9th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    A quick update. Al-Jazeera and AFP are reporting that at least 20 people have died in the clashes in two Tunisian cities during the last 24 hours.  Citing trade union sources, al-Jazeera says six were killed in Thala and a further 14 elsewhere in the Kasserine region...
  • 9th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    We now have the unprecedented situation of major civil disturbances in two neighbouring Arab countries, both of them arising for similar reasons. (For the latest developments, see below.) On its own, the trouble in Algeria might not be a particular cause for concern (or celebration, depending on...
  • 8th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Yesterday – day 22 of the Tunisian uprising – the US State Department made its first public comment on events in Tunisia and neighbouring Algeria. A senior official said: We’re certainly watching what’s happening both in Tunisia and Algeria with a great deal of interest. We did call in...
  • 7th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    It is three weeks today since Mohamed Bouazizi lit the flame in Tunisia. How are we to regard the events since then? How should we characterise them? Writing for the Guardian last week, I used the word "uprising", though I can't say I gave it a lot of thought at the time. Based on...
  • 5th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
        Where freedom of speech is not allowed, people still find ways to express their message. Students at an engineering institute in Tunis arranged themselves to spell out the words "tunus hurra" (Free Tunisia) on Monday. Schools and colleges in the capital had been surrounded...
  • 4th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    As the Tunisian uprising continues on the ground with no sign of abating, the battle over information is intensifying on the internet. Yesterday there were numerous reports of Tunisians' Facebook pages and email accounts being hacked – presumably by the regime – with Yahoo users...
  • 3rd January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Mohamed Bouazizi, the jobless young man who set fire to himselfin Tunisia last month triggering a wave of anti-government demonstrations across the country, died of his injuries last night, according to a report on the nawaat website. Bouazizi, 26, was selling fruit and vegetables...

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